On June 18, state-chartered banks and their fintech partners received welcome news in ongoing litigation challenging the scope of Colorado’s opt-out from the interest exportation regime established by the Depository Institutions Deregulation and Monetary Control Act of 1980 (DIDMCA). The US District Court for the District of Colorado issued a preliminary injunction prohibiting state officials from enforcing state-specific interest limitations against any member of the plaintiff associations—the National Association of Industrial Bankers, American Financial Services Association and American Fintech Council—with respect to any loan not “made” in Colorado, where “made” means that the lender is located and conducts certain key loan-making functions.Continue Reading DIDMCA Opt-Out Update—District Court Constrains Colorado Opt-Out

On May 30, the Supreme Court issued its opinion in Cantero v. Bank of America, N.A., in which the Court was set to decide whether national banks must comply with state interest-on-escrow laws (and by extension, certain other state laws). Rather than providing a clear preemption standard, the Court sent the issue back to

On May 22, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”) issued an interpretive rule purportedly clarifying the breadth of the term “credit card” for Truth in Lending Act (“TILA”)/Regulation Z purposes in the buy-now/pay-later (“BNPL”) context (the “Interpretive Rule”). The clarification asserts that “digital user accounts” that permit consumers to access credit in the course of a retail purchase are “credit cards,” subjecting the “card issuer” to certain additional disclosure and substantive obligations under Federal law. The Interpretive Rule would become effective 60 days after publication in the Federal Register. The CFPB is accepting comments on the Interpretive Rule through August 1, 2024, notwithstanding that the Bureau’s position is that notice-and-comment rulemaking is unnecessary for its interpretation to become effective.Continue Reading CFPB Interpretive Rule Exposes Some BNPL Programs to Credit Card Requirements

On May 10, the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas granted the credit card industry at least a temporary reprieve from a CFPB rulemaking that would have restricted late fees on consumer credit cards significantly (as described in more detail in our prior Legal Update).Continue Reading CFPB Credit Card Late Fee Rule Stayed . . . For Now

On March 5, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (the “Bureau”) issued a Final Rule that would significantly restrict late fees that consumer credit card issuers may charge to a mere $8.

Within two days, the Final Rule faced a challenge in the Northern District of Texas by a coalition of trade groups including the United

On March 5, the CFPB issued a final rule that would significantly reduce late fees that may be charged on consumer credit card accounts from $30 or more to $8 in most cases. A proposed rule on this subject matter was issued February 1, 2023, and the credit card industry has paid close attention to the rulemaking process since.

The final rule amends provisions of Regulation Z, implementing the Truth in Lending Act, related to permissible penalty fees—including late fees, NSF fees, returned payment fees, etc.— that a card issuer may impose on consumers who violate the terms of a credit card account subject to the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act of 2009 (the “CARD Act”).Continue Reading CFPB Finalizes Significant Restrictions on Credit Card Late Fees

Following closely on the heels of a Georgia law enacted in May, Connecticut and Florida have become the latest states to enact laws requiring providers of small business financing to provide disclosures to recipients—and in Connecticut’s case, to require certain commercial finance providers to register with the state. We examine the unique and interesting provisions

Providers of commercial financing should take note that Georgia has become the fifth US state to enact small business financing disclosure requirements since California started the trend in 2018. Georgia Senate Bill 90 was signed by Governor Brian Kemp on May 1, 2023, and takes effect January 1, 2024. The Georgia law applies to transactions of

Pennsylvania Attorney General Michelle Henry just announced an $11 million settlement with a rent-to-own provider resolving allegations of deceptive and predatory financing practices. The May 15, 2023, settlement, which is awaiting court approval, resolves allegations that Snap Finance LLC and its affiliates (“Snap”) disguised the nature of financing products it offered, concealed outstanding balances, engaged in deceptive collection practices, and used a web portal that allowed retailers to sign consumers up for financing without their knowledge, among other claims.Continue Reading Pennsylvania Targets Rent-to-Own Company Over Practices

The US Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has finalized its December 2022 preliminary determination that commercial finance disclosure laws recently enacted in California, New York, Utah and Virginia are not preempted by the federal Truth in Lending Act. The CFPB’s final determination confirms for a wide range of small business financers and brokers that they are